Last edited by Dunris
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

7 edition of Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus found in the catalog.

Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus

a study of 1 Timonthy 2:9-15 in light of the religious and cultural milieu of the first century

by Sharon Hodgin Gritz

  • 102 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by University Press of America in Lanham .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Ephesus (Extinct city)
    • Subjects:
    • Bible. N.T. Timothy 1st, II, 9-15 -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.,
    • Women in the Bible.,
    • Ephesus (Extinct city) -- Religion.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 163-173) and indexes.

      StatementSharon Hodgin Gritz.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBS2745.2 .G75 1990
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 186 p. ;
      Number of Pages186
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1866134M
      ISBN 100819181102, 0819181110
      LC Control Number90024216

      For now, let us look more closely at the accomplishments of women teachers in the early church. In Paul's letter to Timothy (II Timothy ) he tells us that the apostle Timothy followed the faith of his grandmother Lois and his mother Eunice. Chapter tells us that from childhood Timothy had learned the sacred Scriptures.   It was in Ephesus that the sick were healed by Paul’s old handkerchiefs and aprons (Acts ). It was in Ephesus that the seven sons of Sceva lost a punch up with a demon possessed man (Acts ). It was in Ephesus that a massive pile of magic books were burnt (Acts ).

        The Apostle Paul came to preach the Good News at Ephesus around 54 A.D., which was in between the Temple’s first and second destruction. In approximately 56 A.D., Paul spoke out against the false goddess, Diana. This threatened the livelihood of the townsmen at Ephesus who made their living by manufacturing silver shrines of the goddess. Footnotes. 1 Rebecca Groothuis, Good News for Women: A Biblical Picture of Gender Equality, (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, Inc.) p 2 Good News, p. 3 Good News, p. 4 Good News, p. 5 She argues that Jesus' submission was only temporary, for the sake of accomplishing a particular task. But this seems like an unimportant distinction to me. We are always called on to submit to.

      Artemis of Ephesus. Statue from the Amphitheater of Lepcis Magna. The goddess was originally, before her cult was taken over by the Greeks, called "Artimus", and her temple - one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - received gifts from the Lydian king Croesus (cc).She is related to other Anatolian mother goddesses, like Ephesians believed that Artemis was born in. “while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul took the road through the interior and arrived at Ephesus “ Acts The first Christian community in Ephesus was established by St John and developed by St Paul. Paul came in to the city to fulfill the promise that he had given on his brief visit when returning from Corinth and stayed for about three and a half years and also wrote his letters to.


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Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus by Sharon Hodgin Gritz Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book “Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess of Ephesus”, was given a limited distribution by University Press, a publisher of academic books, and so it was not read by many people and is very difficult to find.

As with many academic books, I find the best route is to use some version of Interlibrary loan. Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus [Gritz, Sharon Hodgin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus5/5(1). Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus by Sharon Hodgin Gritz,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(2).

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All books are in clear copy here, and all files are secure so don't worry about it. Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus. Lanham: University Press of America, © (OCoLC) Online version: Gritz, Sharon Hodgin, Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus.

Lanham: University Press of America, © (OCoLC) Named Person: Artemis, von Ephesos Göttin; Paulus, Apostel.English, Book edition: Paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at Ephesus: a study of 1 Timonthy in light of the religious and cultural milieu of the first century / Sharon Hodgin Gritz.

Gritz, Sharon Hodgin, "paul, women teachers, and the mother goddess at ephesus: a study of 1 timothy in light of the religious and cultural milieu of the first century. lanham, new york, london: university press of america XII, p., 37,50 d." published on by De Gruyter.

Paul and Women Teachers: Understanding 1 Timothy, Chapters 1 & 2. Did Paul restrict the role of Christian women in the New Testament Church. Exactly what did he write in the scriptures most used to forbid women from teaching men.

This article gives an in depth English translation and a look at the time in Ephesus where it was writen. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more.

Ephesus is mentioned multiple times in the New Testament, and the biblical book of Ephesians, written around 60 A.D., is thought to be a letter from Paul to.

Gritz, Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother of Goddess at Ephesus: A Study of 1 Timothy in Light of the Religious and Cultural Milieu of the First Century, She writes, “Perhaps, [however], ὑποταγῇ does not refer to a person – one’s husband – at all.

The context deals with how women should learn. In Phrygia, the mother goddess was called Cybele. The Ephesian Artemis is sometimes too closely compared with the Phrygian Cybele. The cult of Artemis Ephesia in the first century AD was distinct from the cult of Cybele.

Cybele was just one of many gods and goddesses worshipped in Ephesus. In Syria, the mother goddess was called Atargatis. By Leona Glidden Running, Published on 01/01/ Article Title or Book Review Reference. Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus: A Study of 1 Timonthy in Light of the Religious and Cultural Milieu of the First Century [review] / Sharon Hodgin Gritz.

> Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus: A Study of 1 Timothy in Light of the Religious and Cultural Milieu of the First Century ISBN: ISBN 19 body of his letter (cf.

Gal ; Rom ; 1 Coretc.) The problem in Ephesus is false 20 teachers whose teaching must be stopped. This concern with proper teaching runs throughout the 21 letter.

It can be most clearly seen in Paul's use of the Greek word for teaching (didaskalia) and its. Looking for a book by Sharon Hodgin Gritz. Sharon Hodgin Gritz wrote Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus: A Study of 1 Timothy in Light of the Religious and Cultural Milieu of the First Century, which can be purchased at a lower price at S.

Gritz, Paul, Women Teachers, and the Mother Goddess at Ephesus: A Study of 1 Timothy in Light of the Religious and Cultural Milieu of the First Century (Lanham, New York and London: University Press of America, ) The assumption seems to be that the only women Paul would value as partners are women who functioned as authoritative teachers of men.

That Priscilla’s name comes before Aquila’s (Acts ) is a slender thread with which to topple the plain meaning of 1 Timothy and 1 Corinthians Wandering teachers like Paul would set up on a street corner, perhaps outside a shop or the giant Library of Celsus, and share their good news.

But unlike the other teachers who educated and inspired, Paul was a threat to the local economy. Paul’s message that Jesus was Lord. This meant a lot of things, but one of them clearly effected Ephesus.

In the novel, Xenophon of Ephesus talks about cultic activity associated with wealth, and specific things women used to show their piety to the goddess Artemis—namely, dress codes and hairstyle.

This is significant, as it links directly to the first instruction Paul gives to women. But from the above-mentioned address of Paul at Miletus, from the narrative in the Acts of the Apostles, from general statements in Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians, and from the epistle addressed by the Saviour to the church at Ephesus, as recorded in the Book of the Revelation, we can learn much in regard to its character.Paul writes Romans from a.

Ephesus in the year 50 or 51 b. Corinth in the year 57 or 58 According to the book of Acts, Paul's first convert in Philippi was a. Lydia b. Thecla c. Gaius d. Priscilla. a.

Lydia included the worship of the sun and stars and of the mother goddess a. Athena b. Cybele c. Artemis d. Guadalupe. b. Cybele.But, more importantly, Ephesus attracted many influential Christian leaders, including Paul, John, and Timothy. (Ephesus claims to be the last place where Mary, the mother of Jesus, lived, though.